It’s April Vacation Here and This is How I’m Balancing

How does a work at home mom who has many hats survive April vacation week? Ask me in about four days.

No, seriously though, this isn’t my first school break week trying to figure out how to juggle the trio while working the multiple tasks I do from home. If you’re a work at home parent like me who needs to keep that work flowing even during school break, here are some ways I have learned to juggle the parent vs work at home life when school is out.

Tips to Juggle School Break and Work at Home

Tips to Juggle School Break and Work at Home

Remain Calm

The first tip I can give any parent who’s trying to get their client work done or blog writing completed with kids running around in the background is to remain calm. One day your kids will be grown up, out of the house and living their own life. Do not take one moment for granted and don’t let the busyness of work keep you from enjoying this happy chaos. Breath before speaking if you’re trying to get work done and the kids are simply loud as loud can be. At this moment, once you’ve remained calm, you may speak up in a kind voice to let the kids know they can be loud in a little while but you have work to do so could they either go outside or just be a bit quieter for a bit longer.

Set Expectations

I totally bombed it this April vacation and didn’t do what I usually do in the summer break season – set up a poster board with a timeline of the day. I usually set expectations for my younger two kids because one is on the autism spectrum so he does well with a visual list of times for his day to day tasks. Since I didn’t prepare, I am winging it but with expectations verbally told. I let the kids know if they give me the morning to do my work that in the late afternoon they will have me to interact with and enjoy life. Let your kids know that you expect them to have certain boundaries respected while you’re getting work done and express those in a calm, respectful manner.

Enjoy Little Moments

The trio and I have a really great relationship, while things were rocky for a bit due to a situation here, the bond is growing back like it was before all of that bad stuff happened. Currently, the trio and I are back to having a mutual respect and trust for each other. The trio knows that when I say this will happen, it will happen which wasn’t the case for the past couple of years. I remind myself to take a break come afternoon to go for a walk, sit and interact with the trio as they enjoy a YouTube video, show or game of their own. I listen to them and laugh with them. These little moments actually make it easier for me to work around their vacation days.

Be Realistic

Lastly, I have learned to be realistic with what I can accomplish during April vacation or even summer break. I have learned where my limits are, what hours of the day are best for me to get work done without the youngest needing some Mama attention and so forth. When I start setting realistic expectations my stress levels reduce and I’m able to successfully juggle both work and parenthood. The only way I could start being realistic was to stop thinking that I had to do it all and do it all in the same day. I learned that I have limits and need limits to remain happy and healthy.

Juggling your kids during any school vacation while working at home isn’t easy. As your kids get older, the juggling may be easier but not always. My kids are age 9 and up yet still that little man needs his Mama’s attention sometimes more than he did when he was a toddler. Remember that while you’re busy making a successful business online, your kids are growing up. Be certain that you maintain a proper balance between parenthood and work so that your kids don’t grow up feeling as if you put making money before them. There will always be time to make money, especially when you work from home but this moment with your kiddos won’t be around forever.

Cheers to your success and ability to remain calm, set expectations while being realistic and enjoying those little moments of childhood while they last.

 

Do You React Or Respond To Your Child

Sometimes as parents, we can forget to take the time and respond in a positive way when are child needs us. We might react and say, “Stop crying right now!” or leave them to throw a fit and walk away. We have the choice to take the time, help develop that strong relationship and help your child through the situation they are struggling with. Do you react or respond to your child? Below I will share some examples, and why it is important to respond vs. react.

Do You React Or Respond To Your Child

Reacting to Situations

If your child is having an issue not listening, throwing a fit, you simply tell them to stop crying or get over what they are going through. You give a short answer and don’t try to help in the situation.

Responding to Situations 

When you respond to your child, you make sure to take the time to work through the problem and show empathy. You allow your child to share how they feel and try and help find the best solution. If your child is throwing a fit, you say come here let’s talk and offer a hug or a kiss. Allow them to feel their emotions are validated even if you think they are a bit dramatic.

Examples of React vs Respond 

React: Quit crying right now.

Respond: Come sit down and let’s calm down and tell me why you are so upset.

React: Good going you just made a huge mess on the floor.

Respond: Uh oh, we better get the broom and pick it up, we had a little accident.

React: All you are doing is whining today, I can’t stand it.

Respond: You seem to be having a rough day, why don’t you tell me what is going on, and what we can do to make this better.

When kids are little they can be pretty dramatic, but we have to remember that they are learning how to deal and control their emotions. It is up to us as parents to take the time to help them and teach them how to work through those emotions! If we simply shut them down, they are not learning valuable skills for later on. But, if we take a deep breath and help them work through it in a calm, cool and collected manner we are setting them up for success as they grow! em what they want. You just want to offer a positive spin on things. Don’t always be quick to anger and tell them to stop or their feelings don’t matter, just try to work through it.

I will admit some days are easier than others, but you will benefit your child. They will learn that they can trust you and that you care about their emotions. If your child is throwing a huge fit, tell them to talk in a regular voice and tell you what the trouble. If you have a bad day, and react instead of respond, know that it is okay, and tomorrow is a new day!

Next time a meltdown arrives, choose to respond and step away from reacting! Your child will learn from you how to deal with situations, and if we don’t take the time to teach them, they will miss out on these valuable lessons for their future!